Opinions, best practices and research into B2B marketing strategy and practices

Laura Matheson

I like to wear many hats (although not literally because of the resulting squished hair) and delight in knowing a little bit about a lot of things. I’ve always been a writer and a reader, which led me to complete a Master of Library and Information Studies degree – although that turned out to be more about information technology than actual books. This achievement furthered my desire to organize everything and to wield my IT knowledge to help people connect with information and each other. As part of cylindr BBN, I write and strategize about B2B marketing and branding, including digging into GDPR and user privacy, flexing my SEO muscles and wrapping my head around the nuances of Danish to English translation. Outside of the 9-5, I teach yoga (mostly the relaxing, lazy kind) and hang out with my dog a lot.

Why bad English-language writing is bad for business

Disorganized English language letters - pink on a white background

Customers and potential customers judge you and your company by the content you produce – and if you’re marketing to an international audience with poorly-written English-language material, you can expect to be judged harshly. In an era of ever-increasing concern about fraud and personal data safety, badly written content could be scaring away even more potential customers – and making you look like a twit.

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Five ways clear ‘opt-outs’ encourage subscribers to opt-in

Red exit sign giving users the option to opt-out

Many companies are still reeling from the tightened requirements for subscriber consent in marketing. The turbulence that accompanied the full implementation of GDPR has prompted some less-than-ethical marketers to devise creative ways to prevent users from opting out or unsubscribing. The assumption being that un-willing subscribers are better than reduced list sizes.

But making it simple to leave is part of the equation for convincing people to stay.

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Why ‘should’ can take a long walk off a short pier

swimming pool ladder bright blue yellow

Hot on the heels of an exceptionally hot European summer and CNN naming Copenhagen as the best city in the world for swimming, the nearby beaches and harbors are still teeming with people cooling off in the open water. When I complain about the heat, I’m often told, ‘You should go for a dip!’

The only valid reason I can see for swimming is to avoid death by drowning – but that ‘should’ stops me in my tracks. It carries a sense of obligation, judgement, pressure and, most of all, guilt.

I don’t like to swim, but I should.

Should is for things we don’t want to do. Should is based on the expectations of others. Should is inconsistent with our own values and how we want to behave. Continue reading